Hi All

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ConnorL
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Hi All

#1

Post by ConnorL » Thu May 16, 2019 10:23 pm

Hi All,

Hope everyone is doing well on here. this is my first model railway forum that i've joined.

When i was younger i got the usual Hornby Model Railway starter kit (OO) but didn't get much use as i didn't have the space. I'm now 21 and have loft space to be able to create a model railway for myself!

I've watched a lot of Youtube video's of various layouts and tips but still unsure on which way i want to proceed.

The set i still have is in good condition however, the only problem i have is the controller which works for around 2 minutes but then all power cut's out totally, i believe the problem is caused by my controller being so old (Picture attached.)
Image

Should i buy a new controller for this (Wouldn't know a good alternative) or to buy a DCC kit and start over? Also is Hornby track good enough to use or should i buy totally new track also?

Any help would be most appreciated

Thanks

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IanS
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Re: Hi All

#2

Post by IanS » Thu May 16, 2019 11:21 pm

Firstly, welcome. You've come to a good forum to get your questions answered.

I'll answer the 2nd one first with a few questions.....

Is the Hornby track good enough? Yes it is good enough for a starter set and well beyond.

You don't give any details about the space you have. Is it 6foot by 4foot, about the size of a table top extended? (1.8m by 1.2m as you're young enough to understand metric!).

Is it able to be left on show or does it need moving out of the way?

That leads to the 1st question, do you get a replacement of the similar type or do you go DCC. The answer again leads to a number of questions...….

A simple like for like replacement will cost very little, even if you get a slightly improved controller with more outputs (for more locos). A DCC controller will need also a DCC chip installing in your existing loco (or a replacement loco) and can work out at considerably more. My advice would be look at Gaugemaster Analogue controllers as a first step - good quality and re-sellable if circumstances change or you wish to progress to DCC.

Some engines can be easily upgraded to DCC, some can't. Investigate the cost of the process and the chips that are available - there can be considerable variation from a basic chip to the all singing and dancing ones. DCC controllers are similarly variable in cost.

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bulleidboy
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Re: Hi All

#3

Post by bulleidboy » Fri May 17, 2019 12:28 am

Hi - Welcome to the forum as IanS has already said it's a great place for help, information and advice. Obviously a new analogue controller will get you up and running. Then again as has been said you need to give some serious thought to what you are going to do. Personally, I would go DCC - I did right from the word go, I bought a Hornby Elite - not necessarily the best controller, but it works for me. You then need to give serious thought to location and size - will it be on a board, will you have a dedicated room, shed in the garden. There are so many questions before you start - lets be honest this is not a cheap hobby no matter what you decide to do - but you don't have to do it all on day one. Ask any questions you like, you will always get an answer (or several!). Best of luck. BB
Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.

Mountain Goat
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Re: Hi All

#4

Post by Mountain Goat » Fri May 17, 2019 1:18 am

I think IanS answer sums it up. The easiest option is to get something along the lines of a Gaugemaster Combi which is DC, but if looking at DCC, buy something good. On a tight budget and want to get DCC? Rather then buy a budget DCC controller, why not buy a decent secondhand one like a Lenz set 01 or set 100? They were the best in their day and even today are not bad, and can be found at very good prices, but only buy if the seller can guarantee it is working and can provide a complete instruction manual in English (You will need good instructions with any DCC controller you end up getting).
Enjoying freelance modelling in 7mm narrow gauge Feel free to ask questions relating to the Mountain Goats Waggon & Carriage Works thread.

footplate1947
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Re: Hi All

#5

Post by footplate1947 » Fri May 17, 2019 3:06 am

Hello CL Welcome to the forum ... WE all start from small beginnings . Well most do. As far as the controllers are concerned just because they are old does not mean they should not work. If you are going to get involved in the hobby having good controllers is a good start. I would recommend you look at Gaugemaster controllers, they are one of the best but are not cheap. If you keep an eye on eBay they often come up at very reasonable prices. They have the advantage of having a lifetime guarantee. And that does mean lifetime not just for the first purchaser. I have three which are quite old and never had problem with any of them. You may have thoughts about going for DCC which can have many advantages over DC. But DCC costs quite a bit to get everything set up , You will have to decide which way you want to go, either DC or DCC .....
If only there was enough hours in the day..................John

glencairn
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Re: Hi All

#6

Post by glencairn » Fri May 17, 2019 11:18 am

Welcome on board, ConnorL.

As already being mentioned, (I endorse) Gaugemaster for your controller.

Glencairn
To the world you are someone. To someone you are the world

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Mr Bones
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Re: Hi All

#7

Post by Mr Bones » Fri May 17, 2019 12:23 pm

Welcome to the forum. Friendly helpful bunch on here.
And the Lord said unto John “Come forth and receive eternal life”, but John came fifth and won a toaster!

mijj
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Re: Hi All

#8

Post by mijj » Fri May 17, 2019 12:33 pm

Hi Connor, welcome and enjoy the journey :) .
Jim.
Watch and pray, time hastes away.

ConnorL
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Re: Hi All

#9

Post by ConnorL » Fri May 17, 2019 12:50 pm

IanS wrote:
Thu May 16, 2019 11:21 pm
Re: Hi AllQuote glencairn #6 by glencairn » Fri May 17, 2019 11:18 am
Welcome on board, ConnorL.
First of all would like to say thank you to everyone who has replied, thanks for the warm welcome.

In response to everybody's question, the plan for my layout is for it to be fixed in the loft, No need for it to be moved. The size i'm thinking is around 9 foot x 6 foot, quite a decent size and room to move around still. Planning to have a hole in the middle where the controls will be and i'm able to reach all corners of the layout.

I've not actually planned out the layout yet but thinking of no more than 3/4 different lines. I have two loco's currently which would both be DC so would need to be converted which makes me think buying a gaugemaster controller. However, eBay seems to be around £100 for a double/triple one (Sorry don't know the lingo!)

I've fount this which is around the same price and would set me up for DCC: https://www.hattons.co.uk/25701/hornby_ ... etail.aspx

My biggest worry is the wiring and electrics as I've not done anything to do with electrics ever( Unsure about how mnay droppers is needed, where about's they should be located etc.) unsure which way would be suitable for a beginner?

Sorry for all the questions but help as usual is very appreciated.

Thanks
Connor

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bulleidboy
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Re: Hi All

#10

Post by bulleidboy » Fri May 17, 2019 1:11 pm

Hi Connor - get hold of a copy of Brian Lamberts book - The Newcomers Guide to Model Railways - usually about £15 on Amazon - it became my "bible" when starting out. BB

Just checked Amazon have copies from £8.49.
Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.

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