DC to DCC.

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trerod
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DC to DCC.

#1

Post by trerod »

Hi, I am converting my end to end layout to DCC, i have a NCE Power Cab on order.
I am new to this method and would like to know if i can use my present DC power feed wires
as dropper wires for joing to the Bus wire ?
Mountain Goat
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Re: DC to DCC.

#2

Post by Mountain Goat »

I don't see why not. One may need to add a few more as needed but many people with DC layouts start changing to DCC by changing to a DCC controller and simplry either joining all their power feeds together or simply switching all their cab control sections to "On" if this makes sense?
Though to get the full advantage of DCC one needs to add additional power feeds besides this to various areas including what would otherwize be "Dead" sidings and isolating sections. (Also not forgetting that due to the nature of DCC having control of more than one locomotive at a time one may need thicker wiring or more of it if neccessary as one is handling a few extra amps of current potential here, but other than that all should be fine).

The basic plan is to have all the track on the layout "Live" and the additional wire droppers to all parts of the layout are not really needed. They just ensure that there are not going to be any areas which may struggle with current collection, as a DC loco may coast over such areas and one may not really notice, but a DCC loco is more likely to notice due to the nature of the additional bck EMF or inertia settings on a DCC decoder. (On older DCC locos that do not have a sufficient amount of pickups I switch these settings off in the programming as these can be annoying, as if these are operating and a very brief interuption of current is sensed by the decoder, they start their inertia settings all over again and the loco comes to a dead stop as the decoder thinks it is starting from stationary all over again. A DC loco will simply coast past any temporary short dead spots which is the only main reason apart from a need to feed additional power feeds to the track due to the controller feeding more locos that one really needs additional track feeds and on most smaller layouts it is not really neccessary. It is just good practice and ensures that things will work more reliably).

So what I would do is wire up what you have using what you have and as you go along adding a few additional power feeds where you need them, both to make dead sidings live and to ensure that the parts of the layout where many locos may be operating at the same time may need a little bit extra.

Some people solder dropper wires to every single piece of track on their layout. A lot of work and one will hopefully get ultra reliable operation, but is a bit overkill for most layouts needs.
Other layouts may operate with a single track feed and little thin point clip spring wire things designed for points to be live in both or all directions (Hornby are said to sell these)... I personally would not rely on these little springy wire things but they do work for smaller layouts... Just they are unlikely to handle much current and as they are not soldered but sprung into position, they can compromise their current collecting ability so reliability may be an issue.

I hope I have covered the topic to make sense of things as I tend to write to much to try and explain what is a simple question needing a simple answer.
Enjoying freelance modelling in 7mm narrow gauge Feel free to ask questions relating to the Mountain Goats Waggon & Carriage Works thread.
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Brian
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Re: DC to DCC.

#3

Post by Brian »

In a word.. Yes!

If you have any section switches they will need to be turned On.
Just ensure all outer rails connect to one DCC Track terminal and all Inner rails connect to the other terminal. :D
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trerod
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Re: DC to DCC.

#4

Post by trerod »

Hi, many thanks for your reply to my DCC wiring question. As it is i have enough
DC wires in place as the main and all sidings have power feed wires attached to them.
This will now save me a lot of work as I can now join all of these wires to a Bus wire with
splicing conectors.
As you may well guess I am new to DCC, I have been arguing with myself for years about
should I ,should I not convert, think I was a bit frightened of it to be honest, but having watched
lots of You Tube tutorials I have now found the confidence to convert.
Also what swayed me was, I love the sound fitted loco's, although i am a steam diehard, I
must admit I think the Diesel loco's sound better,so with that in mind I have ordered a Loksound
Decoder for a Class 26,it was a toss up between that and my Class 205 Thumper!
I also ordered the NCE Power Cab of which I was told was a good entry level controller.
So I have taken the Bull by the horns and gone for DCC, I don't think I will regret it,the
advantages certainly seem to outweigh the disadvantages when operating loco's etc.
Thanks again for all of your help.
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Brian
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Re: DC to DCC.

#5

Post by Brian »

Hi
I would highly recommend that you have either a battery powered Buzzer or a multimeter with a built in continuity buzzer connected across the DCC bus pair of wires or the rails all the time you make alterations. All the while its not sounding you have no issues, but if and at the moment the buzzer sounds you have a crossed connection. Its then very easy to rectify, as its the last wires connected that are wrong. :D
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trerod
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Re: DC to DCC.

#6

Post by trerod »

I do have a meter and will take all that you told me on board Brian,thanks.
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