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Re: Just a few Thoughts On Layout Design.

Posted: Wed Oct 10, 2018 10:22 am
by Mountain Goat
I was admiring your lovely control panels. That's the sort of thing I had in mind for a big DCC layout when I had my own house. It was going to run round the two upstairs bedrooms in such a way that as one walked up the stairs one would be walking into the middle of the layout without knowing. The layout would be narrow and follow the perimeter walls.

Re: Just a few Thoughts On Layout Design.

Posted: Thu Oct 11, 2018 12:10 pm
by RSR Engineer
Couldn't help noticing what MG said. When I posted pix of my lower levels under construction he and WTD both stated their concerns about dirty track and derailments. As I said at the time, I decided to go ahead and chance it. My point here, though, is about hidden sidings. It may have been noticed that my so-called northern sidings (the dark green diagram) are entered "head first", i.e. the train pulls in and backs out. I was inspired by an N gauge layout with this arrangement that I believe I saw on the old Forum. My reasoning was that it's safer to pull than to push through facing points (and, of course, safer to push through trailing ones). I'd be interested to know other members' thoughts on the matter.

URL dark green diagram: https://www.flickr.com/photos/53775591@ ... 833141776/
URL head first sidings: https://www.flickr.com/photos/53775591@ ... 833141776/ (hope I'm not infringing copyright with this)

Cheers,
Artur

Re: Just a few Thoughts On Layout Design.

Posted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 1:52 am
by Ron S
Re push/pull through turnouts. I guess if trackwork & stock is up to scratch , pushing through slowly should be no problems. I remember an old Railway Modeller article in the 1960's in which the owner built his own trackwork and to prove all was good, ran his trains backwards at speed and if things derailed, find & fix.

And of course when shunting, one has to push/pull though turnouts in both directions.

Re: Just a few Thoughts On Layout Design.

Posted: Sat Oct 13, 2018 6:05 am
by RSR Engineer
Thanks, Ron, I'll bear that in mind.
Cheers,
Artur

Re: Just a few Thoughts On Layout Design.

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2018 3:12 pm
by Mountain Goat
Not sure some of today's nem fitted close coupling designed stock likes being pushed. Old Lima coaches can be pushed at speed. Any track issues will be found by pushing ones stock.

Re: Just a few Thoughts On Layout Design.

Posted: Mon Oct 15, 2018 7:40 pm
by RSR Engineer
Good point, MG, thanks. On the old layout I never had any trouble pushing shunting wagons with closecouplers. On some older East German wagons (produced before closecouplers were invented) the bogies are mounted quite sloppily and would sometimes tilt under the pressure of shunting and swing round and derail that way. As we've said before, I'll just have to test everything thoroughly and not use any rolling stock that's unreliable.

Cheers,
Artur

Re: Just a few Thoughts On Layout Design.

Posted: Mon Oct 15, 2018 7:43 pm
by Walkingthedog
I find I can push all my wagons with narrow couplings without derailing, but, I only push them very slowly. At speed I reckon I’d end up with a wagon mountain. :lol:

Re: Just a few Thoughts On Layout Design.

Posted: Tue Oct 16, 2018 10:45 am
by RSR Engineer
Under normal working conditions I also would only shunt my hidden sidings at low speed, Wtd. During testing, though, I do intend to try imitating no. 6220 arriving at Crewe to show up any errors and inaccuracies (of which I'm sure there'll be enough).

Cheers,
Artur

Re: Just a few Thoughts On Layout Design.

Posted: Tue Oct 16, 2018 5:13 pm
by Mr Bones
The biggest issue I have with track design is "monkey see monkey want". I've had to be really strict with myself. I see a turntable, I want one. I see a postal depot, I want one.

After a lot of thought I made a list of what I really needed (not what I wanted) and have tried to stick with that. No easy when there is so much potential with a new layout.

MG your tip about not overdoing the track work is also one that I have had to rein myself in on. Good advice.