Inclines N gauge

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GeoffAlan2
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Re: Inclines N gauge

#11

Post by GeoffAlan2 »

If we accept there's a maximum gradient, whatever it may be, then adding a curve makes that maximum too steep, and the tighter the curve the shallower the maximum gradient.
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Walkingthedog
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Re: Inclines N gauge

#12

Post by Walkingthedog »

The shallower the gradient the better.
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Rog (RJ)
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Re: Inclines N gauge

#13

Post by Rog (RJ) »

Ninemil wrote: Tue Jan 12, 2021 9:43 am
I'm happy to ditch them in favour of gentler curves if necessary, but if they are possible, any ideas on a realistically achievable gradient? 1:40 maybe? As I say, I am at the planning stage so it's not too late to be changing my ideas.
Make a quick mock up plank and see what works for you. I have seen a friend's son's N gauge layout that worked with quite a steep gradient. He was running American diesels.
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teedoubleudee
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Re: Inclines N gauge

#14

Post by teedoubleudee »

Rog (RJ) wrote: Tue Jan 12, 2021 12:12 pm
Ninemil wrote: Tue Jan 12, 2021 9:43 am
I'm happy to ditch them in favour of gentler curves if necessary, but if they are possible, any ideas on a realistically achievable gradient? 1:40 maybe? As I say, I am at the planning stage so it's not too late to be changing my ideas.
Make a quick mock up plank and see what works for you. I have seen a friend's son's N gauge layout that worked with quite a steep gradient. He was running American diesels.
That's what I did. I got a long piece of flat softwood and put some track on it, put it on a level surface and lifted one end till the train started to struggle up the hill. Lowered the end till the loco moved freely, then measured the incline. Simples really but check all the locos you wish to use the incline plus intended rolling stock and use the lowest measurement.
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andruec
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Re: Inclines N gauge

#15

Post by andruec »

I have four planned inclines on my track, and two already in place and working. They are all 2% and for what it's worth every locomotive I have (bought new late last year, three diesels and one 4-6-2) climbs them at a constant speed when comprising nearly a metre's worth of rolling stock with no sign of any difficulty. In fact they can climb them faster than is safe since the inclines are only 1.5 metres long and have curves at either end. I have done a few tests by hitting the 'INC FAST' button on my controller and they all surge forward in response :)

So for N gauge I reckon 2% is an easy incline, 3% is probably not that big a deal and if you really have no choice other than 4% it will probably work.

Curves do add some additional resistance (and probably increase likelihood of a decouple) but I reckon if you stay below 3% you'll have enough pulling power to make it.

The way I built them was:
* Measure out the incline. (distance to rise*0.02).
* Figuratively 'chop a bit off each end' of the ramp.
* Extend the space for the incline a bit more.
This results in the track drooping a bit at each end. Officially my inclines are 1.5 metres for 30mm but are actually more like:
* Ramp length: 1.3m
* Incline length: 1.7m
So that extends the start/end by 20mm to produce an easement. It's not visible to the naked eye but the trains are smooth when they start/leave the incline.
Ninemil
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Re: Inclines N gauge

#16

Post by Ninemil »

Useful tips there, so thanks for those. The "mock up plank" is something that I will need to have a go at. My first suspicion is that I will need to extend the length of track to be able to gain enough height, especially if I stick to the tighter curves. At the drawing board at the moment though. I'd been wondering about the start and end of the ramp too, so the method explained will be useful to bear in mind too.
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andruec
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Re: Inclines N gauge

#17

Post by andruec »

Just noticed a mistake in my instructions. The incline length is <distance to rise> / <0.02). Hence the first half of my inclines rise 30mm over 1.5m. Sorry about that.
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