3D Printing.

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Mountain Goat
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3D Printing.

#1

Post by Mountain Goat »

3D printing trends are getting more and more popular and could easily leave the manufacturers behind, so why don't the manufacturers start adapting now to be ahead of this revolutionary technology?

They could:-

▪ Produce a range of chassis which are easily adapted for 3D use and would also serve as spares for RTR locos and for those of us who are scratchbuilding.

▪ They could come out with their own downloadable programs.

▪ Though I don't like this idea myself, they could come out with their own printers which work from their own downloadable programs.

▪ They could sell a range of paints and transfers.

▪ They could also sell wheels, motors and gears as well as pickups which are designed to be easy to use for those who want to make their chassis.

▪ Provide the materials for the printers to use, and maybe even pre-coloured materials?


While manufacturers maybe reserved about doing this, it may actually save them to be ahead of such trends rather then be behind. Being ahead ready to catch the crest of the wave and they could go far!
Enjoying freelance modelling in 7mm narrow gauge Feel free to ask questions relating to the Mountain Goats Waggon & Carriage Works thread.
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andruec
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Re: 3D Printing.

#2

Post by andruec »

Seems like a good idea to me. I do hope to eventually get into 3D printing. Several people where I work do it and they say it should be feasible.
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IanS
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Re: 3D Printing.

#3

Post by IanS »

Having dabbled and failed with 3D printing I still like your idea.
I'm not sure about them producing their 'own' printers, paints or transfers as they would be getting into areas they have little expertise in. Many 'own' printers are simply re-badged versions of a few top manufacturers.

Selling 'generic' bits such as wheels or gears targeted at the home manufacture seems well within their expertise as does producing a variety of different chassis configurations. They don't have to be super detailed, but generic files for editing.

Selling downloadable files for wagons and coaches would be very interesting, maybe ones that are long out of production and unlikely to return to production due to recent poor sales.
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yelrow
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Re: 3D Printing.

#4

Post by yelrow »

Ian, was your failiure down to machine type, or is it, as i suspect, harder than it looks.
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IanS
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Re: 3D Printing.

#5

Post by IanS »

Machine choice - getting the plate level was something I never successfully achieved. I've about 4 successful prints!
My advice, get a self-levelling machine - that's what I'm going to do when my current spell of buying locos comes to an end.

I also bought a 3d scanner - again, not too successful as I couldn't adjust the light in the room enough. It's basically only a camera on a motor with a motor turning a turntable. The clever bit is the software.
Mountain Goat
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Re: 3D Printing.

#6

Post by Mountain Goat »

I was thinking that the idea would ensure that the manufacturers could keep going in sales and keep the hobby in the limelight.
It would also double up in that people like me who prefer traditional scratchbuilding will also be customers, so the manufacturers will have a wider range of people to sell to.
So if they sold the basics in parts or even sold containers that had assorted parts in them, they would be good for 3D printing enthusiasts as well as traditional scratchbuilders and also those who want to keep their old models on the rails. Basic chassis design would need some thought so it can be made to form many different types of uses. An example is could two 0-4-0 chassis be easily converted to form an 0-8-0 chassis? Or could an 0-8-0 chassis be split to form two 0-4-0 chassis or an 0-6-0 chassis?
The idea is along the lines that people will be making their own freelance models but also be useful for others who either want to motorize their old worn out models, or motorize static plastic Airfix kits etc. The possibilities if the design is made to work are quite interesting.
I realize the chassis would be void of detail, but does this matter? Prehaps detail packs can be bought, or even 3D printed detail pack programs be sold?

There are no limits to how things can progress. Think of Lego or Meccano and how they can be built into different shapes.... 3D chassis can be made also... Axle bearing packs maybe needed for this. But really the potential if the design idea can be made to work is impressive and can impact the hobby in many new ways which will attract new generations of people.
Enjoying freelance modelling in 7mm narrow gauge Feel free to ask questions relating to the Mountain Goats Waggon & Carriage Works thread.
sandy
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Re: 3D Printing.

#7

Post by sandy »

What is the position of copywrite , when people buy products and print more off, of other peoples products. Just wondered.
Does making copies of products become a little risky and leave you wide open to being taken to court by the owner of the product you copy. Sounds risky to me.
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IanS
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Re: 3D Printing.

#8

Post by IanS »

copyright doesn't apply to things - at least according to the UK government website. https://www.gov.uk/copyright#:~:text=Co ... hotography
It is the plans that would be copyright.

As for 3D items, I doubt anyone is going to be too upset if you make items for yourself however they may be upset if you're selling them and passing them off as 'Hornby' or 'Bachmann' items. Whether they will do much is up in the air. E* already has 3D printed items selling as 'Hornby' when in fact they're 3D printed.

I think Patent is the equivalent of Copyright for things.
sandy
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Re: 3D Printing.

#9

Post by sandy »

Thats for your reply Ian , but I guess time will tell don't you think.
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Stese
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Re: 3D Printing.

#10

Post by Stese »

It's my understanding that as said before, copyright is hard to apply here, patents generally protect devices, inventions and solutions to specific problems.

however, printing objects that are demonstrably someone elses design, then you'll likely fall foul of intellectual property and trademark laws.

You'll generally be fine if producing these for yourself, but selling such items would be the no-no.

There are many 'free' designs of things on sites such as thingiverse.
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