Mid-Essex Newbie; Doesn't know which way is up

Just joined, say 'Hello' in here
User avatar
Butch
Posts: 32
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2020 1:44 pm
Location: Mid-Essex
Contact:

Mid-Essex Newbie; Doesn't know which way is up

#1

Post by Butch »

Hi folks just joined, as an intro …

I have no previous experience with model railways at all. I have just inherited the remains of my Father in Law’s N gauge kit and thought I’d make a go of it. He seemed to have a very large marshalling yard from which trains would then head off down a very linear track. I’ll be using the track and the trains and working on my own layout. So far I’ve devised the layout I want and made up a lot of the base board. I suspect I’ve already been over ambitious with the inclines. Before I get much further I’m going to tack a simple loop to it so I can test the transformer and controllers and the trains and their pulling power. My layout has quite a few sets of points planned and the likes. I’ve done some reading on wiring the layout but have yet to get my head around it. Might be easier once I’m on top of dead and live frogs.

From here I’ll head to the N gauge and other sections and start posting questions.

For background; I have previous on model aeroplanes and am working up a couple at the moment, but nothing at all special. I spend a lot of time fooling around with motorcycles, by which I mean trying to keep skanky old rubbish going.

Thanks for having me.

B
All N Gauge
User avatar
Walkingthedog
Posts: 3078
Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2018 5:51 pm
Location: HAZLEMERE, BUCKS.
Contact:

Re: Mid-Essex Newbie; Doesn't know which way is up

#2

Post by Walkingthedog »

Welcome to the forum.

Inclines need to be 1 in 30 minimum, 60 inches to climb 2 inches and that is on a straight incline. If it is curved even shallower. If you can avoid them do so.
Nurse, the screens!
User avatar
bulleidboy
Posts: 1257
Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2018 6:30 pm
Location: Basingstoke, Hants
Contact:

Re: Mid-Essex Newbie; Doesn't know which way is up

#3

Post by bulleidboy »

Welcome to the forum Butch - it's a great place, with lots of help, information and fun. BB
The dumbest thing I've ever purchased was a 2020 planner!!
User avatar
Brian
Site Admin
Posts: 1274
Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2018 3:49 pm
Location: SE Kent
Contact:

Re: Mid-Essex Newbie; Doesn't know which way is up

#4

Post by Brian »

Welcome to the forum.

If I were you, I would before trying to run anything, carry out some basic maintenance and safety inspections.
Initially and visually examine the Mains leads of any item that will be plugged into the mains supply. Look for broken outer insulation and the correct fuse rating inside the plug - normally 3Amp for most model railway items. If its 13Amp replace it. If you discover any cracked or stripped outer insulation on a mains leads or the lead has pulled out of any cord grip DO NOT USE the item until its been repaired and inspected and ideally PAT checked too.
Clean all rail tops ideally with a Track Rubber or the rough side of a strip of Hardboard. DO NOT use any abrasive paper like Emery cloth or Sandpaper etc to clean the rails. Next on the locos, lightly lubricate all pivots and gear wheels. Use only oil sold specifically for model use. DO NOT USE spray lubricants such as WD40 or thicker oils like 3 in 1 etc. Only light oil sold for the purpose should be used (Sewing machine oil can also be used). Remember the lubrication Golden Rule... If you can see it (the oil) its probably too much! Use a piece of kitchen paper or a tissue to blot off an excess oil. Ensure the wheel rims on the loco are clean - Here I would use either a special wheel cleaning kit or a fibre pencil.
99% of poor running is attributable to one of four things or a mix of them all... 1) Dirty rail tops. 2) Loco wheel rims dirty. 3) Lack of lubrication (or too much lubrication) and 4) Poor fitting rail joiners - Fishplates, where rail to rail power transfer relies on these metal rail joiners.

Then enjoy. :D
Image << Click the Icon to go to my website
Bandit Mick
Posts: 565
Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2018 7:42 pm
Contact:

Re: Mid-Essex Newbie; Doesn't know which way is up

#5

Post by Bandit Mick »

Welcome again Butch - I say again as my previous welcome didn’t seem to register. I was a newbie 4 years ago and still am compared to the knowledgeable members on here. I found Brian’s book very useful when I started out. I too ride a motorcycle but not a dribbler - a large Jap. I do less riding than I used to as getting wet and cold doesn’t appeal as much as you get older (and softer some would say). Enjoy the forum.
User avatar
Butch
Posts: 32
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2020 1:44 pm
Location: Mid-Essex
Contact:

Re: Mid-Essex Newbie; Doesn't know which way is up

#6

Post by Butch »

Thanks folks.

I'd guess the stuff I'm starting with has been in storage for maybe as long as 30 years.

And yeah, my inclines are at around 10% at the moment - all a bit too alpine for sure. And on curves also. I wanted to have an express train running through the station at the rear and then disappear underneath to then come around again later on. Working with a board area of around 4*3 feet (excuse my imperial) I'm running a height change of a bit over 2" in a bit over a foot. Maybe if I gang enough locos together?

Details on electrical safety, cleaning and lubing all duly noted, though I'm not known for my patience. Also the chance for an oil thread here (always controversial on automotive forums). I'm big on WD40 so that's a good point.

The model aeroplanes mostly involve control line - standing in the middle clutching a handle whilst spinning wildly; though I have some RC builds on the go, but no flying experience of those.

The motorcycle fleet has examples of Japanese, British and Italian models, and one Danish. Some work better than others, and some not at all.
All N Gauge
User avatar
Butch
Posts: 32
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2020 1:44 pm
Location: Mid-Essex
Contact:

Re: Mid-Essex Newbie; Doesn't know which way is up

#7

Post by Butch »

Bandit Mick wrote: Wed Nov 18, 2020 3:07 pm I too ride a motorcycle but not a dribbler - a large Jap.
Ah, going off piste but I guess from your moniker I can guess the bike. I had a mk1 Bandit 12 that was about the best bike I've ever owned. Got a lot of bang for your buck with that one.
All N Gauge
User avatar
Brian
Site Admin
Posts: 1274
Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2018 3:49 pm
Location: SE Kent
Contact:

Re: Mid-Essex Newbie; Doesn't know which way is up

#8

Post by Brian »

Butch wrote: Wed Nov 18, 2020 3:22 pm <SNIP>
Details on electrical safety, cleaning and lubing all duly noted, though I'm not known for my patience. Also the chance for an oil thread here (always controversial on automotive forums). I'm big on WD40 so that's a good point.
<SNIP>
On a model railways it isn't good. :o WD40 or similar spray lubricants should not be used on a model railway. It works initially, then after a time it becomes "Gungy" thick and stops things working! Horrible stuff, but great for your door hinges etc though. :D
Image << Click the Icon to go to my website
Bandit Mick
Posts: 565
Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2018 7:42 pm
Contact:

Re: Mid-Essex Newbie; Doesn't know which way is up

#9

Post by Bandit Mick »

Bandit + rider = instant hooligan. Don’t know what it is but they bring the worse out in even the most conservative rider!
User avatar
Walkingthedog
Posts: 3078
Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2018 5:51 pm
Location: HAZLEMERE, BUCKS.
Contact:

Re: Mid-Essex Newbie; Doesn't know which way is up

#10

Post by Walkingthedog »

You need at least 5 feet to rise 2 inches..............at least. More locos won’t help. :D
Nurse, the screens!
Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests