Loco weathering - a beginner’s tale

Your place to show and describe in detail and with photos how you produced a specific item of modelling. Rolling stock, Building or something related.
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Steve M
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Re: Loco weathering - a beginner’s tale

#81

Post by Steve M »

Free with this month’s Railway Modeller and an opportunity to try some slightly different techniques.

Overall spray with Halfords grey primer followed by a couple of dirty washes, one brown, one black.
Rusty highlights on strapping and hinges (powder mixed with Decalfix). Soot, green and sand powders for the roof and bottom two planks. Masking tape patches on the roof. Rust and chipped paint on the metal vents at each end and an overall coat of satin varnish.


Image20181110_121445 by Steve Mumford, on Flickr
"Not very stable, but incredibly versatile." ;)
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bulleidboy
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Re: Loco weathering - a beginner’s tale

#82

Post by bulleidboy »

I like that - I bought the magazine the other day, so the kit went onto the "to do" pile.
The dumbest thing I've ever purchased was a 2020 planner!!
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Steve M
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Re: Loco weathering - a beginner’s tale

#83

Post by Steve M »

bulleidboy wrote: Sat Nov 10, 2018 1:23 pm I like that - I bought the magazine the other day, so the kit went onto the "to do" pile.
Unfortunately my ‘to do’ pile has too many non-modelling activities in it at the moment. :D
This builds into a nice model but I did manage to put one side on upside down. Doh!

I picked up the Hornby magazine as well looking for some guidance from their advertised article on loco weathering. Very disappointing imho. It didn’t follow the stages on one loco but jumped back and forth between different models making it very difficult to follow. The author did one almost exclusively with weathering powders and it looked very impressive, but then made no effort to seal the finish to stop it rubbing off. Not a good idea as the effect will soon be spoilt by handling and the pigments don’t wash out of clothes very easily.
Sorry HM, try harder next time.
"Not very stable, but incredibly versatile." ;)
twalton1145
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Re: Loco weathering - a beginner’s tale

#84

Post by twalton1145 »

Blimey Steve, you don't hang about, do you :D !
Super job - looks like it's been there forever.
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Postman Prat
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Re: Loco weathering - a beginner’s tale

#85

Post by Postman Prat »

Steve M wrote: Sat Nov 10, 2018 12:23 pm Free with this month’s Railway Modeller and an opportunity to try some slightly different techniques.

Overall spray with Halfords grey primer followed by a couple of dirty washes, one brown, one black.
Rusty highlights on strapping and hinges (powder mixed with Decalfix). Soot, green and sand powders for the roof and bottom two planks. Masking tape patches on the roof. Rust and chipped paint on the metal vents at each end and an overall coat of satin varnish.


Image20181110_121445 by Steve Mumford, on Flickr
You're really getting into the weathering lark - excellent ;)
PP
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Malcolm 0-6-0
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Re: Loco weathering - a beginner’s tale

#86

Post by Malcolm 0-6-0 »

That's well done - fits into the landscape excellently.
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Steve M
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Re: Loco weathering - a beginner’s tale

#87

Post by Steve M »

Started on some wagon weathering yesterday. This is the first step, an all over wash of black followed by a light spray of frame dirt to the lower parts of the wagons.

Image20181118_095541 by Steve Mumford, on Flickr
"Not very stable, but incredibly versatile." ;)
keef
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Re: Loco weathering - a beginner’s tale

#88

Post by keef »

Steve M wrote: Sun Nov 18, 2018 10:00 am Started on some wagon weathering yesterday. This is the first step, an all over wash of black followed by a light spray of frame dirt to the lower parts of the wagons.

Image20181118_095541 by Steve Mumford, on Flickr
Very good.Effectively subtle
Maltby Main.NT Aus My children inherited 80% of there intelligence from there mother but yeah, the other 30% came from me.
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Steve M
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Re: Loco weathering - a beginner’s tale

#89

Post by Steve M »

Completed the weathering of the goods wagons. A mix of techniques: airbrushed the underframes with frame dirt then washed the metalwork with a mix of rust powder and decalfix. The running gear was then brushed with rust powder and a mix of sand and green powders used on the guards van to simulate a bit of algae on the sides.
I added a load of limestone to one and made a tarpaulin for another then a final coat of satin varnish to seal it all in.

Image20181118_182819 by Steve Mumford, on Flickr

Image20181118_182624 by Steve Mumford, on Flickr

Image20181118_182753 by Steve Mumford, on Flickr

Image20181118_182731 by Steve Mumford, on Flickr
"Not very stable, but incredibly versatile." ;)
Malcolm 0-6-0
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Re: Loco weathering - a beginner’s tale

#90

Post by Malcolm 0-6-0 »

That's realistic weathering on those. I try and keep a bit of variety in the level of weathering in my wagons so that when I assemble a train there's variety from fairly clean through to downright grotty.
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