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Old 06-05-2013, 09:43 PM   #11
alan stonebridge
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Thanks Both,

My copper tape has been in my electrics/DCC box for several years, perhaps I`ll now use it. I`m very tempted if it`s easy to solder to as Albert suggests.

Alan
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Old 07-05-2013, 04:57 PM   #12
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Hi Allan, like the wires I run a little solder on the tape, solder the wire, then hold the wire to the tape and touch the iron to the wire. It bonds instantly and seems to give a good joint. I am still relying on these joints and everything still works.
Albert.
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Old 25-02-2014, 04:31 AM   #13
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Any tips for soldering directly to the metal chassis of, eg a Graham Farish all metal bodied loco ..? Having used the digi-hat to isolate the motor brush from the chassis, the black or red wire from the decoder needs to connect here. Despite extensive cleaning and heating, the solder just doesnt want to leave the iron and flow onto the metal chassis of the loco... presume this is steel...? Special flux/solder perhaps..?
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Old 25-02-2014, 10:51 AM   #14
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Hi
Many metal chassis wont accept conventional soldering. The Bachmann split chassis are one where its almost impossible to get the solder to flow onto the metal.
I have found it best not to try and solder, but either use an existing screw head of a screw thats fixed into the chassis and wrap the wire under the loosened screw he'd then gently retighten or alternatively drill a small pilot hole and fit a small self tapping screw. If you opt to drill do ensure no metal swarf can get into the gears or motor.
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Old 03-11-2014, 06:03 PM   #15
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I will be starting to solder very soon. Having read FB's posting, I went into Maplins, and they now only sell lead free solder. HobbyCraft had a 60/40 tin lead solder but it was 21.50 a reel - ebay here I come.
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Old 03-11-2014, 06:13 PM   #16
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Lead solder is still around try avation suppliers or medical suppliers as it is still allowed for those uses(as we know it works better)

Try RS 6.00 + what ever del is unless you happen to be near a warehouse.
Here

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Old 03-11-2014, 06:24 PM   #17
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Maplin only sell lead free solder.
But there is no reason why lead content solder shouldn't be used or purchased in the UK. Many shops including Wilko and Halfords sell it in small amounts.
IMO lead content is far easier to use! For every day electrical work use 60/40 type.
It's only if an any item that has solder used on it and is to be sold to the public where lead free solder has to be used. EU legislation covers this.
As always, if you use lead content solder throughly wash your hands after you have finished or before eating etc.
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Old 03-11-2014, 06:32 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flashbang View Post
Maplin only sell lead free solder.
But there is no reason why lead content solder shouldn't be used or purchased in the UK. Many shops including Wilko and Halfords sell it in small amounts.
IMO lead content is far easier to use! For every day electrical work use 60/40 type.
It's only if an any item that has solder used on it and is to be sold to the public where lead free solder has to be used. EU legislation covers this.
As always, if you use lead content solder throughly wash your hands after you have finished or before eating etc.
And as I said excludes avaition,medical, and military products for the very good reason lead solder is a better solder.
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Old 02-03-2016, 11:59 AM   #19
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I know this is an old thread, but continuing the soldering lesson, is there any trick/method for soldering very fine wires. I'm about the fit my DCC Illuminated Buffer Stops (LED's) and the wire is like hair. I have attached a slightly thicker wire to the "hair" wire, but not sure how secure the attachment is, and don't want to pull to hard in case I break something - any ideas? BB
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Old 02-03-2016, 12:46 PM   #20
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Thin wires are a problem by the time you tin them the normal way half the insulation has melted and likely contaminating the area you are trying to tin. Probably the best way is to use a solder pot which is an electrically heated container with a small quantity of melted solder in, tinning is just a case of a quick dip. However, they are only cost effective for professional or serious hobbiest use where many components and wires may have to be tinned.

I am not an advocate of melting a blob of solder on an iron tip and then applying it to the work, but in this case it is probably the easiest solution. Just quickly feed the stripped end of your thin wire in and out of the blob and that should tin the wire. If soldering to another wire, then tin that wire as well and then hold the two wires together with a helping hands device and simply apply the soldering iron to sweat the two tinned ends together. As soon as you see the solder flow together remove the tip and allow a few seconds for the solder to freeze before moving the wires.

Richard
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