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Old 27-01-2018, 04:21 PM   #21
The Duke
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I do have a helping hands tool, which I used. I think it is movement of the joint too soon. I think I was lucky with the positive side and only a distraction of some sort like moving things out of the way, prevented me from moving it too soon. The negative wire, I probably moved right away or just too soon. I read somewhere you have to leave it for ten seconds which is much longer than I left it. I didnt get round to trying again last night so I might get to it tonight. I will make sure the iron is turned up a good bit. I have ordered some flux which I should have done in the first place. I definitely need to practice as I think when you see it done on you tube if you havent any soldering experience, it looks much easier than it is.

The fine wire I got is in ten meters each roll so Ive got plenty to practice on .
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Old 27-01-2018, 04:26 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shroomy View Post
As an addition get some self clamping tweezers like these
https://www.ebay.co.uk/i/28232444241...D1425741271340
Good at holding fine wires in the helping hands rather then the crocodile jaws
My wife got my tweezers from the makeup dept. at Morrisons but I do think the clamping tweezers are easier to use so thats on my list too.
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Old 27-01-2018, 04:48 PM   #23
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You really do not need any additional flux normally for electrical soldering, if the wires to be joined are spotlessly clean, the irons tip is clean and the iron is at the required operating temperature and of a suitable wattage. The 60/40 solder will have rosen flux built into it. It will flow easily around and into any joint once the correct temperature in the joint is reached and maintained by the iron. Hence the need for a decent wattage iron.
However, if the 60/40 solder is old stock the flux inside it can dry out!
Flux is really only needed on sheet metal soldering work or plumbing! Using additional flux on electrical joints can lead to the joint rotting eventually due to the acid in many fluxes.
Flux sold specifically for electrical work is ok to use if it really is needed, such as Carrs Orange label, DCC Concepts Sapphire flux or alcohol based fluxes like 'Reflow flux'. But really practice makes perfect and no additional flux is normally required!
I watch videos of people showing 'How to Solder' and applying acid based fluxes to the joints. Its totally unnecessary and will eventually in many cases lead to failed joints! Safety critical work where soldering is carried out on electronic and electrical joints bans additional flux on most joints!

The soldered joint should solidify in five seconds of removing the iron tip on small items! Any movement of the joint during that time can quickly lead to a mechanically failed joint or an electrically high resistance (dry) joint!

Now gets off pedestal and retires for a G&T!
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Old 27-01-2018, 05:31 PM   #24
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Im going to look around the house for some three core mains cable to separate the brown, blue and earth wires to practice on.
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Old 28-01-2018, 04:17 PM   #25
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Success! I got the wires in the helping hands clamps and this time, put the clamps holding the wires nearer the wire ends and closer together. This held them more secure and steady. Tinned the wires, held the soldering iron, which I turned up a good bit, under the joint and after taking away the iron, waited ten seconds to make sure. Solid join! Sorry about the poor iPad photo. Next practice peice will be to solder wires to the underside of a peice of track.
EA41C9A9-6280-44AE-A406-3107E6740D57.jpg
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Old 28-01-2018, 05:04 PM   #26
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Glad to read your mastering the art.
Do practice over and over again. You will become proficient.
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Old 29-01-2018, 08:24 AM   #27
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I watched with interest the excellent MREG soldering display at Eastleigh Exhibition on Saturday and the MREG expert said the soldering iron should be applied on top of a joint as the solder is heavy and will run down into the joint. I am no expert, just advising what he said.
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Old 29-01-2018, 09:04 AM   #28
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Conversely if you put the iron under the joint and tap the top of the joint with solder it will run towards the iron. Must say I usually have the iron on top.
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Old 29-01-2018, 10:26 AM   #29
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I normally have the iron under the joint for electrical connections. It's the way I was taught to do it when I was an apprentice. There are exceptions though, such as soldering components to printed circuit boards (PCBs). Basically whatever works best at the time.
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Old 29-01-2018, 01:46 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flashbang View Post
Glad to read your mastering the art.
Do practice over and over again. You will become proficient.
Thanks, it feels good when something goes right .
The wire onto the LEDs pin was a success first time now that I did it right. Putting it into the signal box however, was very frustrating due to my shakes. The little table and chair came loose. Oh well, the tiny little man will just have to pick them up himself ha ha. Im going to keep myself interested by practicing the various skills needed for layout building etc. so Ill be able to set it all up when the time comes.
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