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Old 11-04-2018, 11:49 AM   #11
Footplate1947
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Was bit too long for Padington Station as well.
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Old 11-04-2018, 11:52 AM   #12
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They were only working class dont waste money on them. I think that was the attitude of the day. John
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Old 11-04-2018, 11:59 AM   #13
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Isn't GWR in design. Looks French to me.
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Old 11-04-2018, 12:21 PM   #14
Footplate1947
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Do you mean the OP MG if so we were talking about cab design in the early days in general.
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Old 11-04-2018, 03:36 PM   #15
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I suppose it dates back to the horse drawn stage coaches that preceded railways. The coach drivers were totally exposed to the elements, whereas the passengers were under cover.

Also the early railways had third class passengers travelling in open carriages.
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Old 11-04-2018, 03:48 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Footplate1947 View Post
Do you mean the OP MG if so we were talking about cab design in the early days in general.
Cab design and the design of the front of the loco. The GWR did import a few De Glens from France to test the idea of compounding, but didnt take it up. The smokebox reminded me of France for some reason, though I've seen some lovely Scottish trains with the lovely curvey cylinders.
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Old 11-04-2018, 03:52 PM   #17
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I have a book which teaches train drivers what they need to know and it dates back to the days of the GWR before they had full cabs. On the front is one of the earlyGWR singles, just visible. The colouring of the cover was dyed in nettle juice by the look of it.
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Old 11-04-2018, 04:43 PM   #18
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MG

This engine was designed by Josiah Evans, the son of Richard Evans who owned the Haydock Colliery and Engineering businesses in Lancashire. The early locomotives for the Haydock enterprise were bought from outside contractors but by 1868 the engineering arm of the business was in a position to design and build its own locomotives, ‘Bellerophon’ is one.
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Old 11-04-2018, 06:20 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mountain Goat View Post
Isn't GWR in design. Looks French to me.
Says it was built by Richard Evans and Sons St. Helens on the makers plate in the picture.

Edit: sorry PT didn’t spot you post.
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Old 15-04-2018, 09:32 PM   #20
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Coal traffic is up, thanks to changes in Federal policy. My train driver
friend tells me that the "Trip Optomizer," akin to a cruise control
designed to save fuel, has been sacked by the organization for
who he works, as it routinely failed to provide enough oomph,
particularly on heavy 15,000 ton grain trains, and the like, to
adequately surmount the small gradients frequently encountered.
This would result in painfully slow ascents, delayed freights, and
outright stalling, clogging the line until cleared.

Among the crews, the Trip Optomizer was referred to a something
that borrows from the Biblical story of Sodom and Gomorrah. Further
explanation would violate perchitude.

Further east, in the waste lands of the Permian Basin, and it is a relative
chamber pot of unimaginably flat sand and scrub. I lived there for a time,
and often thought I could roll a nickel to the horizon. Anyways, I digress,
whilst procrastinating on housework duties, the Pecos Valley Southern is
a small branch line that once trafficked heavily in onions and cantaloupes,
is busy with Frack sand.

The 47.2 KM track is the most wretched I have ever seen. Ancient Alco
switchers gingerly tip toe at not much more than 8 KPH, with the
brakeman hanging off the front step searching for broken rail, hauling
rusted hoppers. For lunch, the crew stop the train and dine at the
Burrito Depot, dodging tumble weeds. Again, with release of Federal
restrictions on the process of fracking, they may have to repair the track
as business is booming. Gas flares and jack pumps dot the landscape.
For amusement, people drink weak American beer and ride the things
up and down.



So much frack sand is required to site, that a large industry of frack sand
trucks bellow up and down ancient stage coach and Indian trails back and
forth to well heads. Paid by the load, these fellows earn upwards of 70,000
quid annually. No state income tax, either.

Such is the fever, they don't like to stop at railway tracks. My train driver
friend, after 18 years of only striking the occasional mule deer, blasted
two sand truck semis to smithereens inside of a month, as they attempted
to beat the train. Such lunacy decreased sharply after the second incident.
Word must have got out.

Robert and train crash.jpg
(My friend demonstrates the collision, above. It should be noted the
company names are NOT representative of the collisions, mere the
type of vehicle).
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