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Old 09-08-2018, 10:51 AM   #21
Footplate1947
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Having noticed Tinkers post about the Petrol tankers I think we can be grateful that none of those came trundling past while we had burning embankments going up. Sometimes they burned very well indeed especially if there were lots of bushes and trees around during a dry spell.
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Old 09-08-2018, 11:12 AM   #22
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Having the emergency services on the lineside can be a worrying time for railway staff, because although most were pretty savvy about lineside safety we did occasionally get officers who normally worked in areas remote from the railway who were unaware of all the hazards. Because of that while I still worked for Railtrack I participated in liaison meetings and exercises with the emergency services. These activities were some of my favourites, and in particular the full scale exercises, when we took over a section of the railway on a Sunday morning and set up a crash scenario and then called in the emergency services.
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Old 09-08-2018, 11:22 AM   #23
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Well I can assure you LC that the Essex County Fire and Rescue Service previously in the steam days were called the Essex County Fire Brigade were always trained well in the practices of entering Railway Property and awareness of the dangers and safety practises which were always observed during incidents we were involved in.
As for other Fire Brigades around the country are concerned, I cannot comment.
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Old 09-08-2018, 04:54 PM   #24
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Yes, the fire service were usually pretty good track-side, the police perhaps less so. We usually hoped the BTP would get there before the county force. Some firemen did have one bad habit though of throwing an aluminium ladder across the rails expecting this to put the signals to danger by shorting out the track circuit before calling the signalman, or in the worst cases instead of. Unfortunately (a) not all lines had continuous track circuits and (b) rail head contamination sometimes prevented the ladder to complete the circuit.

In my days in Control I did occasionally get drivers reporting 'near-misses' because we didn't know the emergency services were on the line.
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Old 10-08-2018, 12:17 AM   #25
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As a county police officer in a previous life, we were always told not to enter onto railway property without first getting the go ahead. I recall one incident where the last train into town on Christmas Eve had a passenger that thought they had seen a body on the beach beside which the line ran and called the police. It was a stretch of shoreline perhaps 3 miles long. I got the job of checking it out. It was completely impossible to walk along the beach due to it's nature and I had to walk along the track. After getting the nod, off I set. Not too long into my yomp, I heard an engine approaching. It turned out to be the local 08 shunter, going along from where it usually resided and worked to be shedded (is that a word?) for the holiday period. It stopped by me and the driver asked what I was doing. I explained and his response was to say that I would see much better from his cab. So I climbed aboard. He then said "Whose going to drive then?" So I got to drive the 08 along to the next station (unmanned of course), where I alighted. My first and only experience of driving a full sized BR locomotive. On arriving home after work, my young family asked what I had done at work, to which I replied "I drove a train". Cue much confusion about my job. Oh, there was no body on the beach by the way.

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Old 10-08-2018, 12:21 AM   #26
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Anyway, back to the subject in question. I suppose, depending on the era you are depicting, mostly were it towards the end of steam, you could have a siding populated by some interesting decrepit locomotives taken out of service and awaiting their last journey to be scrapped.
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Old 10-08-2018, 10:38 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LC&DR View Post
Yes, the fire service were usually pretty good track-side, the police perhaps less so. We usually hoped the BTP would get there before the county force. Some firemen did have one bad habit though of throwing an aluminium ladder across the rails expecting this to put the signals to danger by shorting out the track circuit before calling the signalman, or in the worst cases instead of. Unfortunately (a) not all lines had continuous track circuits and (b) rail head contamination sometimes prevented the ladder to complete the circuit.

In my days in Control I did occasionally get drivers reporting 'near-misses' because we didn't know the emergency services were on the line.
LC after reading that about putting a ladder across the track proves that some Brigades were not quite up to scratch. Quite apart from anything very dangerous. Which was why I said I cant speak for Brigades other than Essex. I cant imagine how much problems doing that could cause even if the track protection system was operational it would have caused problems by just stopping everything. The procedure was to contact control via radio who rang BR. other than that we would use the same safety procedures as BR work gangs used using a warning horn and lookout. They were the days One of our biggest worries on our local lines were the overhead wires.
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Old 10-08-2018, 10:49 AM   #28
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What about a gang of track workers and equipment or firemen putting out a fire. With the work gang you could have a BR truck or van nearby with firemen you could have a fire engine somewhere, and it would be interesting to see how some modellers may try and model fire burning. That sounds like a challenge.
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Old 10-08-2018, 11:26 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Footplate1947 View Post
What about a gang of track workers and equipment or firemen putting out a fire. With the work gang you could have a BR truck or van nearby with firemen you could have a fire engine somewhere, and it would be interesting to see how some modellers may try and model fire burning. That sounds like a challenge.
I have seen a number of exhibition layouts with fire scenes using flickering LEDs and cotton wool for smoke, and imho they look awful. Smoke is dynamic so using a stationery blob of cotton wool just doesn’t work.
In one of this month’s railway mags one of th models has a patch of burnt and charred grass on an embankment - now that does look good.
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Old 10-08-2018, 12:26 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve M View Post
I have seen a number of exhibition layouts with fire scenes using flickering LEDs and cotton wool for smoke, and imho they look awful. Smoke is dynamic so using a stationery blob of cotton wool just doesn’t work.
In one of this month’s railway mags one of th models has a patch of burnt and charred grass on an embankment - now that does look good.
I saw that and wondered what on earth it was supposed to be! Thanks for that!
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