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Old 04-11-2017, 07:59 AM   #1
Pjlons83
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Default Station signals

Hi All,

Apologise if this is a really simple question but Iíve tried searching and canít find an answer. Maybe Iím using the wrong terminology. I am really new to the world of trains in general.

At a station, sometimes the trains go straight through without stopping and sometimes (obviously) they stop at the station. Iím assuming that there must be a signal somewhere either before or after the station that indicates whether or not the train will stop? Does anybody have a picture of this and a description of what indicates what. If anybody can recommend a website or book for me to read up on signals in general then Iíd be very interested, even at a very basic level.

Thank you in advance.
Paul
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Old 04-11-2017, 08:27 AM   #2
John squiggly
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Paul try this web site.
https://signalbox.org/index.php
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Old 04-11-2017, 08:31 AM   #3
LC&DR
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No, there is not usually a signal. It is all down to the driver knowing the timetable and where he should stop.

At the few request stop stations still about the passengers are told to hail the train just like they do for 'buses, by holding up their hand. Passengers getting off tell the guard who tells the driver.

In the official public timetable the stopping times are printed. If no time is shown the train does not stop. In the staff timetables sometimes the space is blank, or sometimes it is shown as a passing time with a 'slash' between the numbers meaning "don't stop".
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Old 04-11-2017, 08:31 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John squiggly View Post
Paul try this web site.
https://signalbox.org/index.php
A useful link John - Many thanks.
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Old 04-11-2017, 08:57 AM   #5
Pjlons83
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Thank you for the link and the info.

Iím thinking about adding more features to my layout. (In my head only. The layout is in very early stages). Iím planning on using DC with sensors controlled via an arduino. When in continuous running, the train will pass through the small remote station, but when I flick a switch the train will stop at the station. I was thinking off adding a signal or light on the layout that indicates that the train will be stopping the next time it arrives.

It doesnít need to be technically accurate so maybe just a green/red light and a signal arm. Iíll have a read of the linked site and look for some images for inspiration.

Any thoughts on what may look realistic(ish).

Thanks
Paul
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Old 04-11-2017, 11:16 AM   #6
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On a DC layout this will perhaps be the simplest?.... link to signal and track section see second drawing.
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Old 04-11-2017, 11:50 AM   #7
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Some stations have signals. Most dont. This is due to the track layout design and the signalling system used.
Part of a conductors job is to check he had the right diagram and check if the diagram has the stops on the back and the times of the stops. If the stops are missing he/she has to manually write them in from train timetables. Then it is the conductors responsibility to make sure the driver knows these stops.
If a signal is in the on position (In other words the stop position) the train has to stop regardless if it is a booked stop or not. Likewize, if it is a booked station the signal could be in the off position. The signal itself has no bearing on if the train stops for passengers or not.
I hope this helps.
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Old 04-11-2017, 02:33 PM   #8
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Thanks again chaps.
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Old 04-11-2017, 06:29 PM   #9
LC&DR
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It was generally frowned upon to use a signal to stop a passenger train at a station it was not booked to stop at. What was supposed to happen was that the driver was given a 'Special Stop Order' at a station before he got there ideally at the place the train started from, but if not, at a booked stopping place en-route.

Special stop orders were a paper form filled in and signed by a station master or supervisor and usually authorised by the Operations Control, or the Divisional Manager. The driver was supposed to hand it in at the end of his shift with his 'drivers ticket' and the signing on point was then supposed to send it to Divisional HQ. Checks took place and woe betide any station who issued one without authority!

Very occasionally the Special Traffic notice published an instruction to the station master to issue special stop orders. These were often done to allow military or other parties to travel in a group as a special excursion. Milton Range Halt between Gravesend and Strood was a popular location for this to happen, for shooting parties going to and from the gunnery ranges.

Last edited by LC&DR; 04-11-2017 at 06:34 PM.
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