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Old 06-08-2017, 12:43 AM   #11
Mountain Goat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teedoubleudee View Post
Thanks J6. A tually my post was a tease as I dont have any cows (or room for any) on this layout. I expect it will help somebody though.
Saw Welsh blacks today. There is a colour for you!
Never forgot when I worked on the trains and a catering staff said she collected sheep. She said she had every type of sheep (We are talking of stuffed toys, ornaments and things like that... Not real sheep) that was available. I promised I could get her sheep she didnt have. I had a couple of 00 gauge sheep, and while I was in Cardiff I nipped into a model railway shop and bought some N gauge sheep. When I gave her the sheep she couldn't believe I had found her sheep she didnt have! She never knew they were made.
Well, I know it wasn't cows, but....
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Old 27-08-2017, 08:05 AM   #12
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Colour of cattle:
No matter what era you model, you may safely add black and white cattle to your layout.
B & W's were imported from the continental lowlands as early as 1840.
The British Friesian Society was formed in 1909 to promote the breed.

Shaun.
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Old 27-08-2017, 02:20 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Teedoubleudee View Post
Good idea for a thread.

So what colour should I spray my pre WWII cows?
Brown is a good start.
In the Devon area up to the 60s Devon Reds were the most common breed. They are a reddish brown,colour. My uncle had a farm in Devon when I was little, my sister and I would spend some of the school summer holidays with Uncle on the farm. All uncles cows were Devon Reds till about 1970 I think.
You can still see Devon Reds but they are not so popular these days. I dont know why, they produced lovely milk. Think the black and whites (Friesians) are better milkers. ..................John
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Old 27-08-2017, 02:56 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cardi-Bach View Post
Colour of cattle:
No matter what era you model, you may safely add black and white cattle to your layout.
B & W's were imported from the continental lowlands as early as 1840.
The British Friesian Society was formed in 1909 to promote the breed.

Shaun.
Not in Devon...........John
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Old 27-08-2017, 03:46 PM   #15
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Not in Devon...........John
Agree John - they were mostly in East Anglia and Lincolnshire. A few may have migrated across the country, and would have been a rarity, but could have been seen.
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Old 27-08-2017, 04:06 PM   #16
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what colour would be the buckets for milking the cows , in GWR country ,would they be green or red ??? also did they change the colour of the buckets after BR black took over ??/ thanks for any info regards Dave
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Old 27-08-2017, 04:57 PM   #17
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Very funny Ha Ha.
They had milking machines even in the 50s, expect that was before you were born. But for your information, if they were used, they should have been stainless steel. John
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Last edited by Footplate1947; 27-08-2017 at 05:01 PM.
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Old 27-08-2017, 05:13 PM   #18
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hi John-- many thanks for your reply -- I was born in 1950 so I doubt I can remember the colour - would it be ok to paint the buckets silver ?? as close as possible to s/steel ??? ( only joking, the weather is hot and it has gone to my head ) next we will be talking about the height of the cows ??/ lucky they are not made of metal or we would be rivet counting HA HA regards Dave
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Old 31-08-2017, 02:09 PM   #19
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If you run an engine and coaches make sure at least one coach is a brake coach. The only exception to this is the auto coach which doubles up as a brake coach with a brake handwheel.
If you have a single non brake coach behind the engine add a guards van that is normally for goods use. This will allow the train to go into service and is how some preserved railways were run.
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Old 31-08-2017, 03:29 PM   #20
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All goods trains had to have a guards van at the rear until the railway was fully dieselised in 1968. After that fully fitted trains could be run without a guards van provided that the guard could ride in the rear cab of the locomotive. Trains worked by two class 20 locomotives on multiple had to have a guards van for a longer period until all the fleet could be fitted with communication equipment cab to cab. Before 1968 certain trains particularly Freightliner trains were run without a guards van but there were all kinds of issues to be sorted out with the Trade Unions at the time.

Trains conveying certain classes of dangerous goods, Nuclear, Explosive and Toxic, needed a guards van on the rear right down until the 1990s. After then many freight trains ran without a guard at all, the driver being the only person on the train. DOO(NP)
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