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Old 08-04-2018, 06:00 PM   #11
yelrow
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WTD, Great minds, bought a box of these. prior to starting. Over here you can buy these complete with screws, from time to time, in Aldi/Lidl.
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Old 08-04-2018, 06:00 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by centenary View Post
Must admit it can get pricey very quickly. For seven 1200m x 600 flatpack boards they are wanting just over 500 quid which is a lot.
Hi centenary. If you have £500 to spare before buying all your track, trains etc, then by all means go ahead. But you could save a lot of money going to a decent timber merchant, selecting the timber, and asking them cut to sizes that will fit your car. Some will deliver free if you can wait until they have another delivery in your area. I used 9 mm ply and 69 x 18 mm framework (I think). I'm no carpenter, but it is not that difficult to construct - main things are planning and patience. Use a square to get accurate 90 deg angles, and if you don't have a mitre box, then clamp a bit of spare timber along the line.
Remember, measure twice and cut once. I learnt this the hard way.
Good luck and enjoy the build!!

Ted

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Old 08-04-2018, 06:06 PM   #13
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Twalton, was that from Harry Green, measure twice, etc. Remember Norm Abrams, and his safety glasses. john
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Old 08-04-2018, 06:15 PM   #14
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I am pretty naive when it comes to woodworking, ok with metals etc. And made mine but did have a handheld circular saw. I bought a chop saw that was handier than the manual . I built the basics with help from peeps on this forum in a couple of afternoons. I had my boys help in insulating/carpeting my garage as it isn't integral, is single brick and I had to add a heater. We had an insulated roller door fitted as the up&over door had large gaps and was droughty.
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Last edited by mijj; 08-04-2018 at 06:16 PM.
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Old 08-04-2018, 06:23 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yelrow View Post
Twalton, was that from Harry Green, measure twice, etc. Remember Norm Abrams, and his safety glasses. john
No! 'twas from dear long-lost Dad, who was a carpenter/joiner, but sadly passed few of his skills on to me.
Ted
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Old 08-04-2018, 11:13 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twalton1145 View Post
Hi centenary. If you have £500 to spare before buying all your track, trains etc, then by all means go ahead. But you could save a lot of money going to a decent timber merchant, selecting the timber, and asking them cut to sizes that will fit your car. Some will deliver free if you can wait until they have another delivery in your area. I used 9 mm ply and 69 x 18 mm framework (I think). I'm no carpenter, but it is not that difficult to construct - main things are planning and patience. Use a square to get accurate 90 deg angles, and if you don't have a mitre box, then clamp a bit of spare timber along the line.
Remember, measure twice and cut once. I learnt this the hard way.
Good luck and enjoy the build!!

Ted
Guys, I appreciate you're trying to be very helpful. I cannot saw a straight cut to make a square framework to save my life hence there would be a need spend money on a powered mitre saw for this one task if I was to cut the frame myself.

There's no way I could get 2.1m x 1.2m lengths of plyboard in our car. We only have a twingo, a small city car and the layout Im looking to build will be roughly 4.2m by 1.2m.

My local builders merchant wants 50p a cut. To make a 4.2m by 1.2m baseboard frame with batterns is a lot of wood cuts. I dont want to pay for cut wood then find half is bow legged and the plyboards are warped.

Yes, the flatpack way is expensive and I havent decided on this approach but I was looking for comments on the quality and suitability of these whether by WRM or another supplier.
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Old 09-04-2018, 11:48 AM   #17
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Plywood was never designed to be cut by hand, it is possible for some of the thinner sheets but it blunts handsaws for fun. I think 9mm would be my maximum. As for your seven baseboards two 8'x4' boards would only require 3 cuts each to give you eight the size you want. If you are not "tooled up" and can foresee future use for power tools then there are various options to DIY. A circular saw run against a batten will produce straight cuts but careful measuring of the offset is required. A simple saw board you make yourself used with a circular saw is the simplest accurate solution. Next up the pecking order is a plunge saw, this is a circular saw mounted on a guide plate, simply clamp the plate alongside the line of the cut plunge the saw and push along. Aldi do one fairly cheap every so often and you can get extension guide plates for making long cuts.

For cutting square cuts in softwood under framing as someone has already mentioned a mitre block and handsaw is the the first option. Next is a mitre frame, this is an adjustable mitring device that usually has a saw attached to guides that ensure you make a straight cut. It can usually be adjusted to any angle including 90deg. for square cuts. After that you are into power tools again.

I would suggest that woodworking does not necessarily stop at the base boards and a number of hand tools will be needed throughout so investing in a few aids to cut square will pay in the long term anyway.

Richard
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Old 09-04-2018, 02:34 PM   #18
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Get the baseboards cut square for you - abuse the free cutting service if you use a well-known DIY chain but check for warps first. Then, build the frame to the top - that way you get pretty much guaranteed right angles and you can trim the 2 long sides at least square by carefully using the baseboard as a guide. Screw and glue the frame to the baseboard and countersink the screws - you don't have to be bang on arcurate!
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Old 09-04-2018, 02:53 PM   #19
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The cross members donít really have to be square. It really is dead easy and will save you a fortune.
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Old 09-04-2018, 03:17 PM   #20
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I find the saw blunting curious, as have had same handsaws for 23 years, and never had need to sharpen. Mine are Sandvik. Admit to having a 14.4 volt cordless, circular saw, that i bought 24 years ago, same blade. Never come across warped plywood, from a reputable source. I do swear by Sawmills, where, given a cutting list, they will deliver to size. Joinery, is not for everyone. Mine was based on trial and error, and the need to cost cut. I had an uncle who never did DIY, etc. My aunt said Jack cant do things like that. Lucky guy got away with murder
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