Model Railway Forum

Go Back   Model Railway Forum > Model Railway Construction > Wiring & Electronics > Other


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 29-01-2018, 01:58 PM   #31
The Duke
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 136
The Duke is an unknown quantity at this point
Default

I held the iron under and then I stroked the top of the joint with the iron. The solder formed a “raindrop” under the joint when I held it still. I stroked it under the joint then left it to dry. The solder seems to string out a little sometimes along the joint which I suppose can be an advantage.
__________________
“Y’ain’t a real Dook y’know!” (In the voice of Walter Brennan)
The Duke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-01-2018, 02:10 PM   #32
Teedoubleudee
Senior Member
 
Teedoubleudee's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Downham Market
Posts: 3,089
Teedoubleudee is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Duke View Post
I held the iron under and then I stroked the top of the joint with the iron. The solder formed a “raindrop” under the joint when I held it still. I stroked it under the joint then left it to dry. The solder seems to string out a little sometimes along the joint which I suppose can be an advantage.
If it formed a "raindrop" you are using too much solder.
__________________
If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong
Teedoubleudee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-01-2018, 03:23 PM   #33
Tricky Dicky
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: West Yorkshire
Posts: 641
Tricky Dicky is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Duke View Post
I held the iron under and then I stroked the top of the joint with the iron. The solder formed a “raindrop” under the joint when I held it still. I stroked it under the joint then left it to dry. The solder seems to string out a little sometimes along the joint which I suppose can be an advantage.
When doing electrical/electronic soldering you should not move the iron about, it is merely a heat source. The sequence should be hold iron steady on joint, count 1 - 2 - 3 to allow heat transfer from the tip to the two parts being soldered, add solder until it flows round the joint, remove solder, remove iron wait a few seconds for solder to freeze. Moving, stroking the joint does nothing to aid heat transfer or retention. The only time a soldering iron is moved is when using a heavy duty, high wattage iron on a seam in say a brass model and even then it is slowly moved to allow each part of the seam to reach the temperature at which solder will fuse to the metal. In order for any solder to fuse to the joint being soldered then the two parts of the joint need to reach a temperature at which the solder will melt on contact with the metals not the iron. If you watch a plumber soldering copper pipes together you will see him heat the joint with a gas torch, as he applies the solder he will move the flame away using the heat in the pipes to melt the solder not the flame of the torch. In that respect a soldering iron is no different to a torch it is merely a source of heat the only difference in technique is the iron is kept in contact with the joint until the soldering is complete.

Richard
Tricky Dicky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-01-2018, 11:17 PM   #34
The Duke
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 136
The Duke is an unknown quantity at this point
Default

Thanks TWD and Richard, now it’s all making more sense . When I was having difficulty, the clamps of the helping hands were holding the wires too far from the joint ends and a gap between the wires kept opening when they flopped down a bit. It all started to work right when the clamps were closer together, the weight of the wires no longer separating to form a gap. I had spent most of the time trying to close the gap by lifting one of the wires with the iron. This time the wires stayed together and it soldered quickly. It’s quite satisfying soldering something.
__________________
“Y’ain’t a real Dook y’know!” (In the voice of Walter Brennan)
The Duke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-01-2018, 01:53 PM   #35
John squiggly
Junior Member
 

Join Date: May 2015
Location: Llantwit Major
Posts: 14
John squiggly is on a distinguished road
Default

Can't see if anybody suggested this but I buy LED's with resistors already soldered in. They come with 20cm leads and are available at very reasonable prices form China via Ebay.
John squiggly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-01-2018, 02:54 PM   #36
Footplate1947
Eternal Optimist
 

Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Cumbria and Scotish boarder.
Posts: 1,901
Footplate1947 is on a distinguished road
Default

Hay Tricky in my day it was always 1-2-3-1
__________________
I may be wrong as I very often am. John
Footplate1947 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-01-2018, 04:22 PM   #37
Tricky Dicky
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: West Yorkshire
Posts: 641
Tricky Dicky is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Footplate1947 View Post
Hay Tricky in my day it was always 1-2-3-1
Isn't that the quickstep

Richard
Tricky Dicky is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.